survival and self-mythology.



jaegerspice:

trynottodrown:

Antarctic fur seal pups, Arctocephalus gazella, South Georgia Island (x)

silversarcasm:

I hate when people ask me like “Wouldn’t you rather not be disabled?”

Because like yes obviously I’d rather there weren’t massive social and physical boundaries and prejudice that existed to limit my life and the lives of other disabled people

but no I don’t want to remove my disorders, they are a part of me and to remove them would be to replace me with someone else

nevver:

What we’re reading

thethreeeyedhero:

Ofoe’s Studios of Colors at #ChaleWote2014 with DiQueku and Ofoe Amegavie

Surprising Facts About Adolf Hitler

wtfhistory:

thisblogisnotgovernmentapproved:

Nothing positive he ever did in his life can ever count for anything considering the millions of innocent dead people. Shocking, I know.

Casual reminder.

(Source: nataliekrim)

milkykissu:

ideal

doodlesbytara:

hey babe *wraps you up in a blanket* i know today might have been hard for you *ruffles your hair* but you made it through the day *boops your nose* you’re doing such a good job *kisses your forehead* and i am so proud of you

(Source: pupsofficial)

archiemcphee:

Colossal, the Department of Incredible Insects recently encountered more photos of the fascinating work of French artist Hubert Duprat and his industrious Caddisflies (previously featured here).

"Right now, in almost every river in the world, some 12,000 different species of caddisfly larvae wriggle and crawl through sediment, twigs, and rocks in an attempt to build temporary aquatic cocoons. To do this, the small, slow-moving creatures excrete silk from salivary glands near their mouths which they use like mortar to stick together almost every available material into a cozy tube. A few weeks later a fully developed caddisfly emerges and almost immediately flies away."

Since the 1980s Duprat has been collecting caddisfly larvae from their normal environments and transporting them to aquariums in his studio. There he gently removes their own natural cocoons and puts the larvae in tanks filled with materials such as pearls, beads, opals, turquoise and pieces of 18-karat gold. The insects still do exactly what comes naturally to them, but in doing so they create exquisite gilded sculptures that they temporarily call home. If you saw them out of context, you’d never guess they’d been created insects.

Visit Colossal for additional images and video of Hubert Duprat discussing these amazing insects and their shiny, shiny creations.