survival and self-mythology.



tajajanel:

my soul is as open as the sky, often times just as blue

tajajanel:

my soul is as open as the sky, often times just as blue

Today’s literary professionals are caught between institutional professionalism and the subversive impulse that brought them to literature in the first place. Whereas the mods were defiantly stylish and mildly rebellious while longing for a greater degree of respectability, English professors are respectable and professional while longing for the passion and engagement and excitement of literature, the Thing Itself of reading. This Thing—call it insight, inspiration, or truth—whatever it was at first, it wasn’t about wanting to publish papers. It wasn’t about wanting to be right. It wasn’t about wanting to talk well or talk fast. It wasn’t about wanting an open schedule, praise for one’s own thoughts, or (though I’m not sure about this one) sex with admirers. It was about literature telling us something we weren’t getting anywhere else. We stayed up late thinking about it and it changed the way we saw the world the next morning.
navisis:

Untitled, 2009
Pedro Cappeletti

navisis:

Untitled, 2009

Pedro Cappeletti

(Source: hatsandanimals)

A racist woman is not a feminist; she doesn’t care about helping women, just the women who look like her and can buy the same things she can.

A transphobic woman is not a feminist; she is overly concerned with policing the bodies and expressions of others.

A woman against reproductive rights — to use bell hook’s own example, and an issue close to your heart — is not a feminist; she prioritizes her dogma or her disgust over the bodies of others.

An ableist woman is not a feminist; she holds some Platonic ideal of what a physically or mentally “whole” person should be and tries to force the world to fit inside it.
blue-voids:

Valeska Soares - Duet, 2008 - hand-carved marble

blue-voids:

Valeska Soares - Duet, 2008 - hand-carved marble

art-creature:

This is some art that I’ve made in 2013.

When I started this blog I wasn’t sure what I was doing. I made a lot of art and didn’t really show it to anyone, except to a few friends.

I didn’t know that Tumblr appreciated art/artists a lot, and I wasn’t expecting so much support and kind words from strangers on the internet haha! and cool opportunities! It’s pretty overwhelming. THANK YOU SO MUCH FRIENDS!! Let’s continue to inspire each other and kick ass in 2014. I am giving you all a shy lil kiss on the cheek. lovelovelove xxxxxxx

fohk:

Charlotte Rutherford

Yayoi Kusama, HEART, 2013

Yayoi Kusama, HEART, 2013

(Source: withoutyourwalls)

stay-human:

I cannot recommend this video enough. This woman breaks it down perfectly.

The Stories That Europe Tells Itself About Its Colonial History

by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

“She said once she was shocked that her son while being taught Belgian history, was taught nothing about Congo. She said “They teach my son in school that he must help the poor Africans, but they don’t teach him about what Belgium did in Congo.” Of course, all countries are evasive about the past for which they feel ashamed, but I was shocked by what seemed to me not evasiveness but an erasure of history

If her son doesn’t learn that the modern Congo State began a hundred years ago as the personal property of a Belgian king, who was desperate to get wealthy from ivory and rubber, if her son doesn’t learn that the hands of Congolese people were chopped off for not producing enough resources to meet the king’s greed, if her son doesn’t learn that the Belgian government later led Congo with a deliberate emphasis on not producing an educated class, so that Congolese could become clerks and mechanics but couldn’t go to university, if her son doesn’t learn that more recently, even though it was the Americans who installed the Mobutu dictatorship, Belgium was a major force behind the scenes propping him up, if this young Belgian boy, knows nothing about these incidents, then, at some point, they would perhaps no longer have happened because the past after all is the past because we collectively acknowledged that it is so. 

This young Belgian boy would grow up to see Africa only as a place that requires his aid, his help, his charity with no complications for him. A place that can help him show how compassionate he can be, and most of all, a place whose present has no connection to Europe. 

It is not that Europe has denied its colonial history. Instead, Europe has developed a way of telling the story of its colonial history that ultimately seeks to erase that history”

(Source: fredjoiner)